american society – HC Ingenieria http://hcingenieria.com/ Thu, 03 Mar 2022 06:19:47 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://hcingenieria.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/favicon-20.png american society – HC Ingenieria http://hcingenieria.com/ 32 32 Ahrenhold, Henry https://hcingenieria.com/ahrenhold-henry/ Thu, 03 Mar 2022 05:17:39 +0000 https://hcingenieria.com/ahrenhold-henry/ AHRENHOLD, Henry Henry Ahrenhold III, nicknamed “Captain” by his 8 grandchildren and 6 great-grandchildren, died peacefully at his home in Atlanta on February 27, 2022 at the age of 93. He was born October 13, 1928 in Brooklyn, NY, the son of Elma Altonen and Henry Ahrenhold Jr. Henry grew up with his sister Joan […]]]>

AHRENHOLD, Henry

Henry Ahrenhold III, nicknamed “Captain” by his 8 grandchildren and 6 great-grandchildren, died peacefully at his home in Atlanta on February 27, 2022 at the age of 93. He was born October 13, 1928 in Brooklyn, NY, the son of Elma Altonen and Henry Ahrenhold Jr. Henry grew up with his sister Joan on Long Island in Manhasset. He graduated from Lehigh University in 1950 with a degree in civil engineering where he was a member of Sigma Phi Epsilon. Henry was a first lieutenant who served 3 years of active duty in the US Army Corps of Engineers during the Korean War and one year in the active reserve in Okinawa. He was awarded the Bronze Star, Korean Service Medal, UN Medal and National Defense Medal, and recently Korea Service Medal from South Korea. Henry had a distinguished career as an engineer in the paper industry across NC, LA and GA and retired from the offices of Georgia Pacific. He was a registered professional engineer and life member of the American Society of Civil Engineers.

Henry and his wife Marilyn (Lyn) have been married for 68 years. Henry was a dedicated carer for Lyn for several years before his death in 2019. He was a loving husband, father and grandparent, always with a gracious smile. Her hobby and love beyond her family was sailing. He raced sailboats at the Savannah Yacht Club and later became a licensed Coast Guard captain, often helping move boats around the East Coast during his early retirement. He loved taking his family on cruises on his boat, Moon River. Henry has sailed most of the East Coast and Gulf Coast of the United States, as well as Greece, Brazil and the Caribbean Islands. He also enjoyed traveling by air or sea and visited many countries on six continents. Henry’s last years of retirement at Sunrise Independent Living were filled with dear friends of dining, bridge, reading, bird watching and puzzles. He rarely missed his long daily walk in the open air.

Henry is survived by three children Peggy (Kevin) Gallagher and Kent Ahrenhold of Atlanta, and Lindy (Lee) Kneipp of Chatham, LA; as well as eight beloved grandchildren Courtney (Josh) Toney of Rayville, LA; Christopher Sanchez of Oxford, MS; Hunter Ahrenhold of Atlanta; James Gallagher (Meghan) of Charlotte; Ashlyn McLin of Shelbyville, Tennessee; Mary Grace Gallagher, Atlanta; Anderson Ahrenhold (Bronwyn) Atlanta; and Tripp Prestridge (Mary Kathryn) of Pineville, LA; and six adored great-grandchildren Brooklyn and Channing Toney of LA, Jacob and Jackson McLin of TN, and Maddie Claire and Addie Mae Prestridge of LA. His beloved daughter Wendy predeceased him.

Henry was a member of Mount Bethel Methodist Church in Marietta. His body was donated to Emory University Medical School; a private family service will take place later in collaboration with the service of the medical school. Memoirs may be sent to the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation (www.crohnscolitisfoundation.org) or the American Cancer Society (www.cancer.org) in memory of Henry Ahrenhold III.

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Lieutenant Governor Coleman Announces $2.5 Million Funding for Infrastructure Improvements https://hcingenieria.com/lieutenant-governor-coleman-announces-2-5-million-funding-for-infrastructure-improvements/ Thu, 17 Feb 2022 01:04:53 +0000 https://hcingenieria.com/lieutenant-governor-coleman-announces-2-5-million-funding-for-infrastructure-improvements/ Funding allocated to Boyle, Mercer and Washington counties BOYLE, MERCER and WASHINGTON COUNTIES, Ky. (WTVQ) – On Wednesday, Lt. Gov. Jacqueline Coleman announced $2,591,699 in funding for Boyle, Mercer and Washington counties through Gov. Andy Beshear’s Cleaner Water Program and the Kentucky Cabinet of Transportation (KYTC) . “Families in Kentucky deserve clean water – a […]]]>
Funding allocated to Boyle, Mercer and Washington counties

BOYLE, MERCER and WASHINGTON COUNTIES, Ky. (WTVQ)On Wednesday, Lt. Gov. Jacqueline Coleman announced $2,591,699 in funding for Boyle, Mercer and Washington counties through Gov. Andy Beshear’s Cleaner Water Program and the Kentucky Cabinet of Transportation (KYTC) .

“Families in Kentucky deserve clean water – a basic human right – as well as access to safe, well-maintained roads, educational opportunities, and support when they need help,” said Governor Beshear. “Today’s investments show what we can achieve when we put our values ​​into action.”

“Investments in infrastructure, like high-speed internet, clean water, roads and bridges, provide Kentucky with a solid foundation to build tomorrow’s economy, today,” said Lt. Governor. Coleman.

The cleaner water program is funded by the American Rescue Plan Act and administered by the Kentucky Infrastructure Authority (KIA). According to Coleman, $250 million was earmarked for the close of the 2021 General Assembly through a bipartisan agreement for water and wastewater grants to fund projects throughout Kentucky. The Bluegrass Area Development District and the Lincoln Trail Area Development District submitted the funding request for this project to the KIA.

Boyle County

  • $1,103,985 was awarded to the Mercer County Sanitation District to improve protection of the health and water quality of Lake Herrington, which supplies water to four neighboring counties. The funding will eliminate 117 individual septic tanks and six holding tanks near Gwinn Island Road.

“Clean water is a vital necessity and an integral part of all healthy communities,” said Senator Rick Girdler. “I want to thank Boyle County for their hard work in making this a priority for their residents.”

“Today, Boyle County is receiving the funds needed to improve critical infrastructure in Kentucky,” said Rep. Daniel Elliott, whose district includes Boyle County. “The improvements that will come from the cleaner water program will help everyone in Boyle County and beyond. Funding for the program comes from ARPA funds the federal government gave us to help us recover from the COVID-19 pandemic, and the legislature voted to include some of that money in SB 36. Along with my colleagues, I voted to pass this budget with these funds in the hope that a program like this will come out of it. I am proud to be part of a legislature that works to improve the lives of every Kentuckian.

“I am very grateful to Lieutenant Governor Coleman and Governor Beshear for investing in Danville and Boyle County,” Boyle County Judge/Executive Howard Price Hunt III said. “Infrastructure investments like this ensure clean water for our citizens for many years to come. “It’s not just reassuring for them, but for me as well.”

Mercer County

  • $172,607 was awarded to the Mercer County Sanitation District to rehabilitate existing sewer infrastructure.
  • $167,607 was granted to the town of Burgin to relocate the fire hydrants to make them more accessible to fire trucks.
  • $147,525 was awarded to the Lake Village Water Association to replace water mains to reduce maintenance costs and improve customer service.
  • $215,165 was awarded to the City of Harrodsburg to rehabilitate equipment at three pump stations, realign sewers, and replace a water main and fire hydrants.
  • $102,608 was awarded to the North Mercer Water District to replace a water main serving the Brentwood Subdivision.
  • $238,000 was awarded to Mercer County through KYTC to resurface portions of Old Dixville Road.

“In my 11 years serving the Harrodsburg City Commission and now as Mercer County Judge/Executive, I have always known that nothing can have a more positive impact on the health, economy, the well-being of our children, our families and our community than access to good quality drinking water and sanitary sewer services,” said Mercer County Judge/Executive Scott Moseley. “We want to thank the Governor and Lieutenant Governor for this wonderful gift to help a very meaningful effort.”

“The City of Burgin is very grateful for this funding opportunity,” said Burgin Mayor Jim Caldwell. “This is a great example of state and local government working together to improve the daily lives of Kentuckians and an example of what the City of Burgin can achieve with simple steps to improve record keeping and proper accounting. “

“The North Mercer Water District would like to thank the governor and those involved in distributing these funds,” said Gerald Sheperson, chairman of the North Mercer Water District. “These grant funds will be used to replace water mains in the Brentwood area of ​​Mercer County. This will allow North Mercer to improve water service in this area which is prone to water main breaks due to aging infrastructure. Maintaining our infrastructure is a priority for the district. Good infrastructure limits water loss and labor hours and allows the district to operate more efficiently. This directly benefits our customers and the water rates they have to pay. On behalf of North Mercer Water District and our customers, once again, we say thank you.

Washington County

  • $444,202 was awarded to the Springfield Water and Sewer Commission to replace a water main and repaint water storage tanks. These are the Willisburg Tank, the Etown Road Tank and the Wesley Road Tank.

“Although I only represented Washington County for a short time due to redistricting, I want to thank you all,” Sen. Donald Douglas said. “I am grateful for the opportunity you have given me and I am thrilled with the funding that will be provided to you. I will continue to include all of Washington County as I work to strengthen our communities across the Commonwealth. grateful for the trust you have placed in me in the State Senate Thank you to everyone who made this possible.

“Washington County is receiving significant funding to improve parts of Kentucky’s infrastructure,” said Rep. Kim King, who represents Jessamine, Mercer and Washington counties. “The county is receiving just over $444,000 to ensure everyone has access to safe drinking water, and I am proud to be part of a legislature that supports improving the lives of people across the Commonwealth. .”

About the Cleaner Water Program
According to Coleman, more than $106 million has been awarded to grantees to fund transformative projects since the call for projects was announced on June 1. , worked with their local development districts and local water management boards to submit projects for clean water program funding. There are 713 water and wastewater utilities in Kentucky.

Funding for the Cleaner Water program is allocated in three ways:

  • $150 million based on each county’s proportion of the state’s population, except for Jefferson County’s share, which is reduced by 50% based on its high per capita allocation from federal law . A list of allowances by county can be found here.
  • $50 million is available for utilities to provide drinking water services to unserved rural customers or utilities under a federal consent decree. The KIA must consider social, economic and environmental benefits in determining allocations.
  • $49.9 million is available to complete a project grant for a project whose cost exceeds a county’s allocation amount and other available grant sources. Social, economic and environmental benefits should be considered in determining project allocations. KIA will receive $75,000 to administer the grant program.

The American Society of Civil Engineers in 2019 projected that Kentucky would face nearly $14.5 billion in water and wastewater infrastructure needs over the next 20 years, including more than 8, $2 billion in drinking water improvements and $6.2 billion in sewage system improvements.

Information about the Cleaner Water Program, as well as grants for expanding high-speed internet, upgrading school facilities, and renovating vocational education centers, can be found HERE.

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Congress passed an infrastructure bill for America | News, Sports, Jobs https://hcingenieria.com/congress-passed-an-infrastructure-bill-for-america-news-sports-jobs/ Sat, 05 Feb 2022 06:53:25 +0000 https://hcingenieria.com/congress-passed-an-infrastructure-bill-for-america-news-sports-jobs/ America’s infrastructure plays a crucial role in our lives. We rely on our infrastructure to get to work, to connect to the internet, to buy something online that depends on our ports, our freight trains, our airports or our highways. We just flip a light switch and wait for the lights to come […]]]>

America’s infrastructure plays a crucial role in our lives. We rely on our infrastructure to get to work, to connect to the internet, to buy something online that depends on our ports, our freight trains, our airports or our highways. We just flip a light switch and wait for the lights to come on. The electricity grid and the other enduring assets that connect our country – roads, bridges, ports, waterways, railways, broadband networks and more – are essential to our businesses, our farmers, our workers, our families and our communities.

Unfortunately, many of our infrastructure assets are not up to the task. In February, the American Society of Civil Engineers gave our nation a “C-” for our infrastructure. And areas like Appalachia, the mountainous region that runs through my home state, Ohio, West Virginia, and a number of other states have their own unique infrastructure challenges. Based on my conversations with Ohioans about the need to fix crumbling infrastructure, it’s no surprise that CNBC and CBS News polls both found that 87% of the public support the efforts. bipartisan to invest in our infrastructure.

The good news is that after decades of talking about it, Congress recently passed and the President signed into law the bipartisan Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act to improve the lives of all Americans by investing in infrastructure. of our country. I was proud to play a leading role in the development and passage of this legislation in the Senate, which provides an unprecedented $542 billion for infrastructure – that is, 100% infrastructure, not social spending – without raising taxes on hard-working American families or the businesses that keep our economy going. . And because these are long-term investments in durable assets and will make our country more efficient and productive, it is counter-inflationary at a time when devastating inflation is on the rise.

Support for this legislation in the House of Representatives by 13 Republicans, including Rep. David McKinley (R-WV), was crucial for the Infrastructure Investment & Jobs Act to become law. His leadership in this effort was essential to making it happen. We both recognize that targeted infrastructure investment will go a long way to addressing the unique challenges facing the Appalachian region. I also want to thank West Virginia Senators Shelley Moore Capito and Joe Manchin for their work in bringing this bill to fruition.

Here’s how this new law will make a difference.

First, it will help more households upgrade to high-speed Internet. All too often, accessing reliable Wi-Fi means going to the nearest library or government building and hoping to get a signal. Unfortunately, Appalachia continues to lag behind the rest of the country in terms of internet connectivity and speed. Especially during the COVID-19 pandemic, this lack of the internet is hurting students trying to do their homework, entrepreneurs trying to start businesses, patients trying to receive virtual healthcare, and many more.

The new law will help more households in the region switch to high-speed internet by providing hundreds of millions for broadband expansion in the region, dramatically improving opportunities for students, workers and families. Additionally, millions more families will be eligible for the Affordable Connectivity Program, which helps low-income households invest in essential high-speed internet subscriptions.

Second, our infrastructure law will help facilitate travel in the region. In parts of Appalachia, a closed road means a substantial 30-60 minute detour to get to school, work, the grocery store, or even the hospital. To help, state governments will receive billions in aid to repair these crumbling roads, as well as hundreds of millions more to repair bridges. The law also contains $1.25 billion in new funding for the Appalachian Development Highway System (ADHS), the 3,090-mile highway system that has significantly expanded highway service in the region over the years — including $95 million $195 million for Appalachian Highways in Ohio and $195 million for West Virginia. Year one funding has already been allocated for this purpose and will help further expand existing transportation routes and connect more communities to the commercial highways that connect our country.

Third, through the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act, Appalachia will see real help to address other important challenges, from resources to better fight wildfires to critical funding to improve water infrastructure. and ensure the availability of clean and safe drinking water in every community. These are substantial and lasting investments that are not only good for the region, but also for our country.

Studies show that building this physical infrastructure will create hundreds of thousands of jobs in a variety of industries, grow our economy, and raise wages for workers over the next 10 years and beyond. It’s no surprise that more than 100 stakeholders from all levels of government and countless industries have supported this bill, including the United States Chamber of Commerce, the AFL-CIO Building Trades Council, the ‘American Farm Bureau and the National League of Cities.

I was proud to join Rep. McKinley and Senators Capito and Manchin in making this necessary investment in infrastructure. Thanks to the Infrastructure Investment & Jobs Act, the Appalachian region and the entire United States will benefit for years to come.

Senator Rob Portman is a Republican representing the state of Ohio.



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“Poor” bridges are considered safe by experts, but require investment https://hcingenieria.com/poor-bridges-are-considered-safe-by-experts-but-require-investment/ Thu, 03 Feb 2022 21:53:01 +0000 https://hcingenieria.com/poor-bridges-are-considered-safe-by-experts-but-require-investment/ As the condition of area bridges came to the public’s attention after Friday’s collapse at Frick Park, many wondered how the widespread deterioration had escaped the general public’s consciousness for so long. The next logical question for many, after it’s been widely reported that 174 other bridges in Allegheny County have the same “poor” rating […]]]>

As the condition of area bridges came to the public’s attention after Friday’s collapse at Frick Park, many wondered how the widespread deterioration had escaped the general public’s consciousness for so long.

The next logical question for many, after it’s been widely reported that 174 other bridges in Allegheny County have the same “poor” rating as the failing Fern Hollow Bridge: what else is keeping these bridges from collapse?

The short answer, civil engineering experts told PublicSource, is that bridges rated “poor” are generally safe to drive on. The rating (which is four, on a scale of one to nine) means that repair work is needed to prevent the condition from worsening further, but experts said the inspection system of the State is effective in identifying and closing bridges before they are in danger. failure.

“This was a disaster and sadly one that happened in our district,” said Cheryl Moon-Sirianni, the PennDOT district executive for District 11, which includes Allegheny County. “But luckily it’s a situation that doesn’t happen very often and that’s thanks to the due diligence of these bridge inspectors.”

Bridges are inspected at least every two years, with some in worse condition being inspected more frequently. The federal government sets standards for inspections, and Pennsylvania inspectors must take a course and be certified by the federal government. Components are rated on a scale of one to nine, with one being “imminent failure” and nine being “excellent”.

Kent Harries, an engineering professor at the University of Pittsburgh who specializes in bridges, said the abundance of poor grades shows that our infrastructure is deteriorating, overall, but “there is no imminent danger “.

Jason Zang, PennDOT’s assistant district manager for construction, said the ratings mean “there is some deterioration on the bridge, but it’s still safe to be open.”

Harries said the thoroughness of bridge inspections can vary from state to state, but Pennsylvania’s inspections are well done. “I would absolutely trust him,” Harries said.

Nationally, the president-elect of the American Society of Civil Engineers, Maria Lehman, cited statistics: she said that drivers in the United States make 178 million trips on poorly rated bridges every day: ” And we don’t see bridge failures very frequently.You’re much more likely to die in a simple car accident while driving on a highway.

The cause of the Fern Hollow Bridge collapse won’t be known until the National Transportation Safety Board completes its investigation, which will likely take more than a year. The most recent inspection, in September 2021, deemed the bridge safe to use.

The Fern Hollow Bridge was one of six of its type in Pennsylvania, known as the “K-frame” bridge. The type has no redundancy in its support design, WESA reported, and requires more rigorous inspection and can be more expensive to maintain. A PennDOT spokesperson said the agency will conduct field assessments of the five remaining bridges in light of the Fern Hollow collapse, and all five are currently rated fair or better.

Load limits

Some bridges, including about 30 in Allegheny County according to state data, are “posted for load,” meaning there is a posted legal limit for the weight of a single vehicle crossing the bridge. .

The Fern Hollow Bridge was one such bridge; it had a posted limit of 26 tons. The limit applies to each vehicle on the bridge, not to the cumulative weight of each vehicle on the bridge.

Lehman said load limits are determined by a mathematical formula, with engineers entering inspection data and indicating how much weight the bridge can safely support.

Enforcement of the limits, however, is up to local law enforcement. Harries said it is extremely difficult for authorities to monitor and enforce limits, especially in urban areas where there are no weigh stations like there are on highways.

“For the most part, it’s unenforceable,” Harries said. “There are a lot of bridges marked in Pittsburgh, and you see big trucks going by. And personally, I just hit the brakes and stay back, you know.

PennDOT officials mostly declined to comment on the application, saying it was a law enforcement matter. Moon-Sirianni, who was asked if the limits were correctly applied, replied: “I hope so, but we can’t answer that for sure.”

The Pittsburgh Department of Public Safety did not provide information about the application at the time of publication.

Harries said the vehicles that were on the Fern Hollow Bridge when it collapsed – including a Port Authority bus – were not heavy enough to exceed the bridge’s posted limit.

“You can’t drive a really big, heavy truck in Pittsburgh,” Harries said, though he noted that concrete trucks and some larger fire trucks are exceptions.

Public notice

Bridges are a part of life in the Pittsburgh area. Last week’s collapse has left many wondering about the security of the infrastructure they use every day.

Although information about the condition of the bridges has been publicly available online, it took a catastrophic collapse in Pittsburgh for many people to catch on to the current infrastructure crisis.

Should poorly rated bridges be marked with road signs so drivers can be warned before using a bridge – like health inspection ratings posted on restaurant doors?

Harries said the concept would not be beneficial because bridges rated “poor” are not considered unsafe by engineers and those that are unsafe are closed as soon as authorities identify that hazard.

“I suspect it wouldn’t be constructive,” Harries said of such a posting system. “It strikes me that this won’t solve anything and we’re not going to fix bridges any faster.”

Zang said the state ratings, while posted publicly online, are primarily for internal management at PennDOT and local authorities and not for the public.

“These condition ratings are more of a tool for transportation departments to get an idea of ​​the overall condition of their bridges,” Zang said. “They are not intended to scare the public or cause concern.”

Moon-Sirianni added that inspectors go through extensive training to assign the ratings, and without that training, “I don’t think [the public] understand what they mean.

If the public gets anything from reading the notes, Harries said, it should be that the region and the country are facing a systemic problem.

“They should understand that it just doesn’t affect the people of Regent Square,” Harries said. “It’s really affecting the functioning of this whole region…Without resources, the poverty is getting worse.”

Charlie Wolfson is PublicSource’s local government reporter and Report for America staff member. He can be reached at charlie@publicsource.org and on Twitter @chwolfson.

These fact-based local reports are having an impact and creating change. Help fuel that impact.

James Baldwin wrote, “Not everything that is faced can be changed, but nothing can be changed until it is faced.” PublicSource exists to help the Pittsburgh area face its realities and create opportunities for change. When we shine a light on the inequities in our region, such as the “completely unacceptable” conditions in McKeesport social housing, things change. When we ask about the decisions of policy makers, like how Allegheny County handles the safety of its employees in the face of COVID-19, things change. When we push for transparency on issues that affect the public, like in the use of facial recognition software by the Pittsburgh police, things change.

It takes a lot of time, skills and resources to produce journalism like this. Our stories are always made available for free so that they can benefit as many people as possible, regardless of their ability to pay. Corn as an independent, not-for-profit newsroom, we rely on donations from our readers to support this crucial work. Can you donate any amount (or better yet, set up a recurring monthly donation) to ensure we can continue to report on what matters and tell stories for a better Pittsburgh?

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We all wanna put those damn power lines underground https://hcingenieria.com/we-all-wanna-put-those-damn-power-lines-underground/ Wed, 02 Feb 2022 06:10:10 +0000 https://hcingenieria.com/we-all-wanna-put-those-damn-power-lines-underground/ Power outages are becoming more and more frequent in America. Research has shown that massive outages increased tenfold between the mid-1980s and early 2010s. Various natural disasters, from earthquakes to fires to snowstorms, can lead to prolonged outages, such as the loss of electricity to 1.4 million customers during Hurricane Florence. The direct costs to […]]]>

Power outages are becoming more and more frequent in America. Research has shown that massive outages increased tenfold between the mid-1980s and early 2010s. Various natural disasters, from earthquakes to fires to snowstorms, can lead to prolonged outages, such as the loss of electricity to 1.4 million customers during Hurricane Florence. The direct costs to consumers are, according to federal calculations, about $150 billion per year. Last winter’s storm in Texas cost the state economy between $80 billion and $130 billion. Insurance losses range from $10 billion to $20 billion, and of course there are also human losses, as cold weather breakdowns cause fatalities.

The problem is compounded by America’s aging and overstretched infrastructure – 70% of electrical infrastructure assets are in the final stage of their life cycle, according to the American Society of Civil Engineers. The question is what to do about it. The most popular idea is to bury the lines underground; but sometimes it makes more sense to keep them above ground and optimize them to better withstand natural disasters.

Moving underground lines would make the power system more resilient overall, but it’s very expensive. A 2018 estimate found that burying North Carolina’s power lines would cost $41 billion (nearly six times the book value of the distribution assets of the state’s three major power companies) and take a quarter century.


Burying lines presents other challenges: underground transmission lines are more difficult to repair, are vulnerable to flooding, require reinforced insulation and are not immune to all weather impacts, as some sources feeding the system are always above ground. For all these reasons, only about 25% of additional power line construction in recent years has been underground. Burying lines is a particular challenge in cities, as it requires digging up old infrastructure.

Still, some cities and regions have chosen this option, including Anaheim, California, and Dakota Energy in South Dakota. The Florida Power and Light Company is embarking on an aggressive landfill initiative through the use of horizontal drilling. But for other governing bodies and utility companies that don’t want to take on the expense, there are preventative measures that can improve overhead line resilience.

One is the use of drones. Aerial inspections can improve safety and do so more cheaply than helicopters and more accurately than ground inspections. As Joseph Flynt writes for 3D Insider“drones have found the middle ground. It’s not as expensive as flying a helicopter, it provides just as good a perspective, and can complete inspection jobs very quickly.

Florida Power and Light has started using drones for maintenance alongside its underground efforts. This required a waiver from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), but new FAA drone rules opened up more options, and several other states adopted the strategy.

Smart grid distribution is another method. It works by shutting down substations before anticipated damage, to restore power faster. According to choose the energy, smart grid technologies also include excess energy storage. Such grids, American Scientist writes, “using sensors to continuously measure the state of different parts of the network, and a series of devices that control the current flowing through different points”, working to reduce disturbances. The Department of Energy has received funding to establish smart grid standards, although there are some concerns about vulnerability to hacking.

A third method is to reinforce the above-ground utility poles themselves. One of these poles, known as Boldur, can withstand stronger winds and harsher weather conditions than most other poles, thanks to chemicals used to improve sturdiness. BASF has promoted their use in regions where storms are frequent, and they are widely used in Japan.

These and other technologies can help improve the resilience of power lines when burial is too expensive an option. The question is whether major US energy companies will implement these upgrades and what role state and federal money should play in funding them. The alternative is power cuts which will become more and more frequent, harming our quality of life.

This article featured additional reporting by Market Urbanism Report staffer Ethan Finlan.

A journalist who focuses on American urban issues. He can be reached at scott@marketurbanismreport.com or on Twitter at @sbcrosscountry.

See more stories by Scott Beyer

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Khaleel appointed Associate Laboratory Director for National Security Sciences https://hcingenieria.com/khaleel-appointed-associate-laboratory-director-for-national-security-sciences/ Thu, 20 Jan 2022 02:00:17 +0000 https://hcingenieria.com/khaleel-appointed-associate-laboratory-director-for-national-security-sciences/ Moe Khaleel has been selected to lead the National Security Science Directorate, or NSSD, at the US Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory. In his role as Associate Laboratory Director, he oversees efforts in nuclear security, non-proliferation, biosecurity, cybersecurity, network security, and security for manufacturing, autonomous systems, and other emerging areas. , said a […]]]>

Moe Khaleel has been selected to lead the National Security Science Directorate, or NSSD, at the US Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

Bill Peter, director of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Manufacturing Demonstration Center, front, discusses a car developed by three-dimensional additive manufacturing Dec. 6 with federal and University of Maine officials.  From left to back are Moe Khaleel, Associate Laboratory Director for Energy and Environment;  Craig Blue, Director of the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Program Office;  U.S. Senator Angus King, I-Maine;  U.S. Senator Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn.  ;  and Chancellor Dannel Malloy of the University of Maine System.
Moe Khaleel, then Associate Director of ORNL's Laboratory for Energy and Environmental Sciences, presents the joint 3D printer project on Tuesday, September 17, 2019.
Greg LeMond, center, meets with Mark Johnson, left, director of the DOE's Office of Advanced Manufacturing and Moe Khaleel, ORNL Associate Laboratory Director for Energy and Environmental Sciences at the time, meet at a reception celebrating LeMond Composites' partnership with ORNL to manufacture low-cost carbon fiber.  The reception was held at LeMond Composites in Oak Ridge on Wednesday, October 12, 2016.

In his role as Associate Laboratory Director, he oversees efforts in nuclear security, non-proliferation, biosecurity, cybersecurity, network security, and security for manufacturing, autonomous systems, and other emerging areas. , said a press release from the ORNL.

“I am delighted to work with NSSD personnel at the forefront of addressing national security challenges, and I look forward to the accomplishments we will make,” Khaleel said in a press release.

Khaleel has been a Projects Assistant since April 2020, responsible for the DOE’s Office of Science’s largest portfolio of projects. During the past year, he also served as Acting Deputy for Science and Technology, helping ORNL achieve all of the notable outcomes set by the DOE.

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Officials tout $1.6 billion in infrastructure funding for PA bridge projects https://hcingenieria.com/officials-tout-1-6-billion-in-infrastructure-funding-for-pa-bridge-projects/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 21:57:13 +0000 https://hcingenieria.com/officials-tout-1-6-billion-in-infrastructure-funding-for-pa-bridge-projects/ State and federal officials on Friday highlighted the impacts the $1.2 trillion federal infrastructure bill passed in November will have on Pennsylvania, with a particular focus on bridges. Pennsylvania is set to receive $1.6 billion over the next five years to repair more than 3,000 bridges across the Commonwealth, according to information provided by Governor […]]]>

State and federal officials on Friday highlighted the impacts the $1.2 trillion federal infrastructure bill passed in November will have on Pennsylvania, with a particular focus on bridges.

Pennsylvania is set to receive $1.6 billion over the next five years to repair more than 3,000 bridges across the Commonwealth, according to information provided by Governor Tom Wolf’s office. In fiscal year 2022, Keystone State will receive more than $327 million in federal funding for bridge projects.

“Pennsylvania ranks second in the nation for the number of bridges in poor condition (3,353 to be exact), so to say we will benefit from the recently announced Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act funding is an understatement,” U.S. Representative Chrissy Houlahan, D.-6th District, said during a Zoom press conference announcing the funding Friday.

Undoubtedly, part of the reason Pennsylvania has so many bridges is the fact that it is home to more than 86,000 miles of rivers, streams, and streams – second only to Alaska in the United States; not to mention all the bridges over other roads and railway bridges.

That’s likely why Pennsylvania ranks third in the nation for bridge funding under the program announced Friday, Houlahan said.

Locally, projects that could benefit from the funding include bridge improvements, repairs and replacements on Route 422 in Berks, Chester and Montgomery counties; and on the I-95, I-476, and Route 322 bridges in Delaware County, according to PennDOT project listings planned for the region.

“Strong infrastructure is essential to the quality of life for all Pennsylvanians, especially strong and safe bridges. Bridges are the lifelines that connect our communities to each other, while modern, reliable infrastructure is essential for the expansion of Pennsylvania-based businesses,” Wolf said in a press release.

U.S. Representatives Chrissy Houlahan, left, and Susan Wild held a Zoom press conference Friday to talk about the impact of the infrastructure bill on bridge projects. (MediaNews Group image from screenshot)

U.S. Representative Susan Wild, D-7th District, said her district in the Lehigh Valley has seen an explosion of warehouses and they are having a huge impact on our roads and bridges.

Improved roads and bridges also serve existing manufacturers and these improvements can encourage future growth, she added.

And it’s not just big business that benefits.

Houlahan, who represents all of Chester and part of Berks Counties, said he visited a baker whose delivery routes have to cross a bridge with limited weight capacity so they can only load half the truck.

“They have to make two trips,” Houlahan said.

Examples like this, she said, indicate that improved bridges not only help businesses, commuters and travelers, but improve quality of life by improving air quality through reduced vehicle emissions.

It’s also timely, Houlahan said, “especially after the flooding and destruction we suffered from Hurricane Ida, our municipal leaders and union teams are ready to rebuild. This investment will benefit our entire Commonwealth.

The program represents the largest investment in bridge repair in US history.

In a press release, U.S. Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg called the program “the largest such investment in U.S. history,” committing $26.5 billion to states over the five coming years. Nationally, the bridge funding program is expected to help repair approximately 15,000 bridges.

“Upgrading America’s bridges will help improve safety, support economic growth and improve the lives of people in all parts of the country – in rural, suburban, urban and tribal communities,” Buttigieg said.

An analysis released last year by TRIP, a national nonprofit transportation research organization, found that Pennsylvania is the 11th worst state in the nation in terms of the state of its interstate system and the 12th worst in terms of condition and structural integrity of its highway. bridges.

The American Society of Civil Engineers gave Pennsylvania a D grade for roads and bridges in its 2018 report, the latest available.

In addition to providing funds to states to replace, rehabilitate, preserve, protect and construct highway bridges, the Bridge Formula Program has dedicated funds to “off-system” bridges, locally owned facilities that are not on the federal highway. system.

While states must normally match federal funding with up to 20% state or local funding, guidelines released Friday indicate that federal funds can be used for 100% of the cost of repairing or rehabilitating these off-system-owned bridges. to premises.

The extra money for bridges is in addition to the $4 billion over five years for state highways that PennDOT will receive under the infrastructure bill. That will average about an additional $1.33 billion over five years, but that’s still well below the additional $8.1 billion a year the state says it needs to deal with normal annual roadwork and the bridges.

Consider that in just one PennDOT district — which includes Philadelphia, Delaware, Bucks, Chester and Montgomery counties — the list of 396 projects to which funding could be applied adds up to about $6.7 billion.

In PennDOT District 7, which includes Berks, Carbon, Lehigh, Monroe, Northampton and Schuylkill counties, the list of needed works includes 372 projects that total approximately $3.4 billion.

“As far as specific bridges go, we’re not there yet,” Pennsylvania Department of Transportation spokeswoman Alexis Campbell said in a news release. “We are doing the 2023 update [to the state bridge program] now. We will use this money wisely, that’s for sure.

While no decision has yet been made on which of these projects will be funded as a result of this bill, Houlahan noted that because so many of the projects on these lists have been under discussion and planned for so long, “many of them are shovels -ready.”

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2021 Smart Talk Again – How Will Pennsylvania Spend Infrastructure Money? https://hcingenieria.com/2021-smart-talk-again-how-will-pennsylvania-spend-infrastructure-money/ Wed, 29 Dec 2021 20:08:22 +0000 https://hcingenieria.com/2021-smart-talk-again-how-will-pennsylvania-spend-infrastructure-money/ December 29, 2021 | 3:02 p.m. Scott LaMar Scott LaMar has worked in radio and television for over four decades. Currently, LaMar is the host and executive producer of the daily news and public affairs program Smart Talk on WITF-FM, 89.5 and 93.3 in Harrisburg, PA. Previously, LaMar was the Senior Public Affairs Producer of […]]]>


  • Scott LaMar

Listen to Smart Talk every day of the week at 9 a.m. and 7 p.m. on WITF 89.5 & 93.3. You can also stream WITF radio live on our website or ask your smart speaker to “Play WITF Radio”.

Throughout this week, WITF is presenting reminder presentations of Talk smart programs which focused on the important issues of 2021. We continue Thursday with Talk smart which was about how Pennsylvania will spend federal money on infrastructure.

More than $ 18 billion will be en route to Pennsylvania under the $ 1,000 billion infrastructure bill signed by President Joe Biden earlier this month.

The money will be used to repair, upgrade and upgrade highways and roads, bridges, railways and public transport, airports and water systems. In addition, cleaning up the environment such as polluted waterways, lead pipes and old gas wells will receive attention and broadband internet access will be extended.

Tuesday Talk smart focuses on Pennsylvania’s infrastructure needs and projects and how the money will be spent.

Appearing on the program are Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection Secretary Patrick McDonnell, Larry Shifflet, Assistant Planning Secretary with the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation, Cathy Farrell, Co-Chair of the Pennsylvania Infrastructure Report Card produced by the American Society of Civil Engineers, and Gene Barr, CEO of the Pennsylvania Chamber of Business and Industry.



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LETTER: The Infrastructure Bill is a “Bipartite Achievement” https://hcingenieria.com/letter-the-infrastructure-bill-is-a-bipartite-achievement/ Fri, 17 Dec 2021 14:44:48 +0000 https://hcingenieria.com/letter-the-infrastructure-bill-is-a-bipartite-achievement/ The American Society of Civil Engineers hailed President Biden’s signing on November 15 of the $ 1.2 trillion infrastructure bill as “a historic bipartisan achievement that represents the largest investment in critical infrastructure in our country. country for a generation or more “. The organization’s praise for the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act (IIJA) is […]]]>


The American Society of Civil Engineers hailed President Biden’s signing on November 15 of the $ 1.2 trillion infrastructure bill as “a historic bipartisan achievement that represents the largest investment in critical infrastructure in our country. country for a generation or more “.

The organization’s praise for the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act (IIJA) is not surprising, as it estimated the U.S. infrastructure investment gap at $ 2.590 billion over 10 years.

According to ASCE:

“Bad roads and airports mean increased travel times. An aging power grid and inadequate water supply make utilities unreliable. Such problems translate into higher costs for businesses to manufacture and distribute goods and provide services. These higher costs, in turn, are passed on to workers and families. “

The IIJA’s $ 47 billion designation for climate resilience, including flood control, is critical. To quote Senator Bill Cassidy (R-LA), co-author of the climate adaptation bill’s provisions:

“There are people living in the parish of Livingston, for example, which was flooded in 2016, whose lives – everything in their life has been destroyed. The photos of their children, the wedding dress they got married in, the house they lived in, which had never been flooded before – the fact that we are helping our fellow Americans avoid this gives me an incredible sense of satisfaction.

Although $ 47 billion for adaptation has been labeled transformational, it is only a fraction of the amount needed. An October report from the First Street Foundation, a flood research group, concludes that a quarter of our country’s critical infrastructure, such as airports, hospitals and power plants, are at risk of becoming unusable due to flooding aggravated by climate change.

Regarding the interest of preparing for climate risks, the fourth national climate assessment states:

“Adaptation cost estimates vary from tens to hundreds of billions of dollars per year, but are expected to save several times that in the long run. For example, using sandbags to protect homes in South Florida may have a 20-to-1 benefit-cost ratio, while levees and levees along the Gulf Coast may have a cost-benefit ratio. benefit-cost ratio of 2.3: 1 for refineries and petrochemical plants.

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change views financing for climate resilience as an investment in avoided costs. According to Brian O’Callaghan, co-author of the United Nations Gap Adaptation Report: “Investing in climate adaptation is a bit like taking out insurance for a known event. We pay $ 1 today to save $ 10 tomorrow.

While the bipartisan infrastructure law protects our communities, ports and roads from climate risks, the Build Back Better Act, which is currently under Senate scrutiny, is said to spend more than $ 500 billion on energy projects. cleanliness and incentives to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and avoid worst climate scenarios.

Carbon dioxide stays in the atmosphere for hundreds of years, and the more we emit, the greater the impacts. The 2019 report, A Climate Security Plan for America: A Presidential Plan for Combating the Security Risks of Climate Change, warns:

“It cannot be assumed that the United States will adapt naturally to the security risks of climate change in the future. The President has a responsibility to protect our national security against future climate threats by ensuring that they never materialize. “

The foresight demonstrated by the climate change provisions of the Build Back Better agenda is refreshing at a time often characterized by wise, but stupid short-termism. The implementation of these policies would signify American leadership and constitute a crucial step in the fight against the climate.

Terry hansen
Hales Corners, Wisconsin.

Contributor position

The Pagosa Daily Post accepts submissions, photos, letters, and videos from people who love Pagosa Springs, Colorado. Call 970-903-2673 or email pagosadailypost@gmail.com


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Everstream continues to invest in network growth through fiber optic construction and acquisition https://hcingenieria.com/everstream-continues-to-invest-in-network-growth-through-fiber-optic-construction-and-acquisition/ Tue, 14 Dec 2021 14:00:00 +0000 https://hcingenieria.com/everstream-continues-to-invest-in-network-growth-through-fiber-optic-construction-and-acquisition/ CLEVELAND – (COMMERCIAL THREAD) – Everstream, the fiber-optic network for businesses, today announced that it has increased the total number of kilometers traveled with fiber by 80% in 2021, to reach almost 27,000 kilometers of optical fiber. This represents the largest annual increase in the company’s network to date and includes year-over-year growth through the […]]]>


CLEVELAND – (COMMERCIAL THREAD) – Everstream, the fiber-optic network for businesses, today announced that it has increased the total number of kilometers traveled with fiber by 80% in 2021, to reach almost 27,000 kilometers of optical fiber. This represents the largest annual increase in the company’s network to date and includes year-over-year growth through the construction of entirely new fiber optics.

Everstream has invested $ 600 million in growing its high capacity, low latency fiber network since 2019. This year, Everstream has built nearly 2,000 miles of fiber route in new and existing markets and completed this growth with the assets of a strategic acquisition. The company also has more than 3,000 miles of fiber road under construction, which is expected to be completed by the end of 2022.

Everstream continues to prioritize investing in our network infrastructure by building new fibers and densifying existing assets to ensure the network exceeds our internal standards for availability, reliability and an ideal customer experience, ” said Brett Lindsey, CEO of Everstream.

In its 2021 report for U.S. infrastructure, the American Society of Civil Engineers gave infrastructure in the United States a grade of C- amid a $ 2.590 billion deficit in infrastructure spending. While the Infrastructure Bill was passed with funds earmarked for intermediate connections, the funding is only a small fraction of the overall digital infrastructure.

Everstream began investing heavily in our network three years ago and is committed to continuing to do so, ”continued Lindsey. “From ever-increasing business connectivity needs to the looming demand for 5G services, high capacity fiber networks are needed to support this growth and Everstream’s new fiber network infrastructure is ready to serve enterprise customers, to support 5G initiatives and more.

Through Everstream’s strategic growth, the company is able to provide businesses in its 10 states with high-capacity connectivity as they scale. The need for increasingly dense fiber networks is driven by businesses’ need for high bandwidth connectivity and the growing need for data centers to get closer to business customers.

As part of its growth in 2021, Everstream also:

  • Built over 10 million feet of new fiber for the second year in a row.

  • Acquisition of Uniti’s fiber assets, expanding Everstream’s fiber network in Pennsylvania, southern New Jersey and northern Delaware, as well as the acquisition of existing Uniti customers.

  • Addition of two major metro markets – Philadelphia and Pittsburgh – to Everstream’s high capacity network.

  • Densification of existing networks in cities through the company’s footprint. Intensification efforts included Everstream’s networks in Columbus, Cleveland, Detroit, Indianapolis, Milwaukee and throughout the state of Michigan.

  • Increase of sites on the net of more than 15%.

  • Over 20% workforce increase through organic hiring and acquisition, including sales and support teams.

As Everstream’s network grows, its customers benefit from more diverse network options and direct connections to data centers and locations in the greater region.

Everstream’s corporate network provides robust fiber optic and enterprise services, including dedicated Internet access, dark fiber, Ethernet and data center solutions. Everstream’s advanced fiber network offers direct peering with all major cloud operators and hyperscalers. With high-speed, low-latency connections, it can support converged Internet, voice and data services at speeds up to 100 Gbps.

To learn more and view Everstream’s network and expansion efforts, visit everstream.net/network-expansion.

About Everstream®

Everstream has raised the bar for enterprise connectivity, delivering an enterprise-only fiber optic network with the speed, reliability, scalability and performance that today’s businesses demand. With over 27,000 fiber route miles and speeds of up to 100 Gbps, Everstream’s corporate network delivers robust enterprise fiber services including Internet, WAN, data center connectivity and dark fiber. Thanks to his “Do what you say, you will ”, Everstream is a valued partner dedicated to the success of corporate clients. For more information, visit everstream.net.


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