Building materials – HC Ingenieria http://hcingenieria.com/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 14:09:50 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://hcingenieria.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/favicon-20.png Building materials – HC Ingenieria http://hcingenieria.com/ 32 32 Retail sales December 2021: https://hcingenieria.com/retail-sales-december-2021/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 13:47:49 +0000 https://hcingenieria.com/retail-sales-december-2021/ A family of shoppers walk out of Walmart with a full cart on November 26, 2021 in Westminster, Colorado. Michel Ciaglo | Getty Images Retail sales fell much more than expected in December as soaring prices weighed heavily on spending, the Commerce Department reported on Friday. The monthly sales report anticipated to end the year […]]]>

A family of shoppers walk out of Walmart with a full cart on November 26, 2021 in Westminster, Colorado.

Michel Ciaglo | Getty Images

Retail sales fell much more than expected in December as soaring prices weighed heavily on spending, the Commerce Department reported on Friday.

The monthly sales report anticipated to end the year showed a decline of 1.9%, much worse than the Dow Jones estimate for a drop of just 0.1%.

Excluding autos, sales fell 2.3%, also well below expectations of a 0.3% rise.

In addition to weak December numbers, November’s gain was revised down to 0.2% from the 0.3% increase initially reported.

Considering that the sales figures are not adjusted for inflation, the data points to a slow end to what had otherwise been a strong 2021 in which sales increased by 16.9% compared to 2020 marked by the pandemic.

The consumer price index rose 0.5% for the month, taking the year-over-year gain to 7%, the highest since June 1982. Wholesale prices also rose, climbing 9.7% over the 12-month period for the largest increase in the calendar year. since the data was kept until 2010.

Online spending was the hardest hit as a share of overall spending, with non-store retailers reporting an 8.7% drop for the month. Sales of furniture and home furnishings were down 5.5% and sporting goods, music and book stores were down 4.3%.

The surge in omicron cases caused damage across the board as consumer activity declined.

Restaurants and bars, which posted a 41.3% annual gain in 2021 to lead all categories, saw a 0.8% decline for the month. Gas stations followed closely for the year, with a 41% increase in sales, but saw a 0.7% decline in December due to lower fuel costs. Gasoline prices fell 0.5% to end a year in which sump prices rose 49.6%.

Only two categories saw increases during the month: miscellaneous retail stores, which rose 1.8%, and building materials and garden centres, which posted a gain of 0.9%.

A separate Labor Department report on Friday showed import prices fell 0.2% for the month, against expectations of a 0.2% increase, the first negative figure since August and due in largely to a 6.5% drop in oil prices.

The figure raised hopes that the inflationary spurt may subside, although much of the movement stems from lower oil prices.

In recent days, Federal Reserve officials have stressed the importance of fighting inflation, with several policymakers saying they expect to start raising interest rates as early as March. The Biden administration has joined central bank leaders in blaming much of the price hike on pandemic-specific factors, such as huge demand for goods relative to services and supply chain issues. .

The price spike, however, came on the heels of unprecedented levels of liquidity injections into the economy from both fiscal and monetary policy.

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9 retailers you didn’t know would recycle your old stuff https://hcingenieria.com/9-retailers-you-didnt-know-would-recycle-your-old-stuff/ Wed, 12 Jan 2022 16:01:10 +0000 https://hcingenieria.com/9-retailers-you-didnt-know-would-recycle-your-old-stuff/ istockphoto As consumers, we create a huge amount of waste, filling landfills with all the products we’ve used and thrown away. While most people have a recycling bin with their trash can, they may not realize that many of the stores they frequent offer exceptional recycling programs for items that can’t go in the bin. […]]]>

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As consumers, we create a huge amount of waste, filling landfills with all the products we’ve used and thrown away. While most people have a recycling bin with their trash can, they may not realize that many of the stores they frequent offer exceptional recycling programs for items that can’t go in the bin. recycling.

These major retailers have robust recycling programs that can refurbish and reuse your old clothes, smartphones, rechargeable batteries, or furniture. And, for items that aren’t reusable, these retailers partner with recycling companies that can break them down into their basic components to create a variety of other products.

While reducing the impact you have on the local landfill is reason enough to turn in your unwanted furniture, tablets, linens, or rechargeable batteries to these retailers, you might be surprised to learn that many of these companies offer additional incentives in the form of coupons, gift cards and redemption offers. Ahead, learn more about some of the best retailers that will take your unwanted stuff.

The big-box appliance and electronics giant has been a leader in recycling, reusing or repurposing 2 billion pounds of electronics and appliance waste since 2009. You can drop off your old electronics at one of over 1,000 Best Buy locations. and even earn gift cards for those that still have value. Best Buy will also carry old TVs, fitness equipment and appliances for a nominal fee when you buy new ones. Best Buy partners with Electronic Recyclers International, which breaks down electronics into materials that can be reused for use in everything from fiber optic cables to airplanes.

Retailers You Didn't Know Would Recycle Your Old Stuff

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Few retailers have a recycling program as robust as home improvement giant Home Depot, which recycles a variety of disposable products. The company partners with nonprofit recycling company Call2Recycle to recycle old lithium-ion batteries that customers can drop off at any of its locations. The Home Depot also collects plastic bags, which it supplies to Trex, the composite decking maker in turn uses the materials in the construction of its products. The Home Depot also has recycling programs for compact fluorescent light bulbs (CFLs) and cardboard boxes.

Not only will Staples recycle your old office supplies and electronics, but they’ll also pay you for it. Through the Staples Rewards program, you can earn $2 on every recycled ink or toner cartridge you bring to one of its more than 1,000 locations. The office supplies giant will also pay you for certain used electronics, including smartphones, tablets and laptops. Plus, they’ll take unwanted electronics and used rechargeable batteries free of charge.

Retailers You Didn't Know Would Recycle Your Old Stuff

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Like other retailers, Walmart will take your used cell phones, Bluetooth speakers, laptops, game consoles, tablets and other devices as part of its trade-in program. Plus, you don’t even have to leave the comfort of your home. Simply enter information about the device on Walmart’s website, get an offer for it, then ship it for free via FedEx using a pre-printed label and you’ll receive an instant Walmart gift card for your efforts.

The presence of mercury, cadmium, lithium and lead in car batteries makes these vital components of cars and trucks one of the most harmful products for the environment. Advance Auto Parts knows this, and therefore the company offers a nice incentive to bring in your old battery once it’s dead. Bring the used battery to any Advance store and you’ll get a $10 gift card, which you can use towards the cost of a new battery or anything else in the store. The old batteries are then used to make new ones.

Although Apple products may be more expensive when it comes to consumer electronics, they hold their value well. Apple makes it easier to cash in on that old iPhone, iPad, Macbook, or Apple Watch by letting users trade in their devices for store credit (Apple will also recycle other brands of electronics for free). If the device is in good condition, it will be refurbished and sold to a new owner. Those that cannot be reused are taken to one of Apple’s recycling partners, where they are broken down and recycled. Many iPhones end up with Daisy, Apple’s dismantling robot, designed to retrieve usable parts from a device.

recycling retailers

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There are few better ways to dispose of used but usable appliances, furniture, and building materials than Habitat ReStores. Habitat for Humanity ReStores have some 875 locations nationwide, all of which accept appliances, furniture, miscellaneous household items, and even building materials. Habitat then resells these items in its store and uses the proceeds to build affordable homes for families. Habitat may not give you a gift card for your stuff, but you can get tax deductions for your donations because Habitat is a non-profit organization.

Retailers You Didn't Know Would Recycle Your Old Stuff

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Have you ever wondered where the used products sold by Amazon come from? The online retail giant will take your old electronics and devices, including Bluetooth speakers and headphones, home security devices, wireless routers and gaming systems. The company will even reward you with gift cards for gently used electronics that she can refurbish and resell. Amazon also takes some products that no longer work. The company will recycle a variety of electronics for free, even covering the cost of shipping them via UPS.

Bedding, mismatched socks, old t-shirts: Clothing retailer H&M collects all linens through the company’s recycling program. H&M collected over 29,000 tonnes of textiles for recycling in 2019. Items were either cleaned and reused as second-hand clothing, turned into other products such as cleaning cloths, or recycled into other products like insulation. The company will give you a 15% discount card on purchases at its store with every bag of used laundry you drop off there.

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Construction Supplier BMC West Closes Perris Plant; 304 layoffs ahead – Press Enterprise https://hcingenieria.com/construction-supplier-bmc-west-closes-perris-plant-304-layoffs-ahead-press-enterprise/ Mon, 10 Jan 2022 20:39:11 +0000 https://hcingenieria.com/construction-supplier-bmc-west-closes-perris-plant-304-layoffs-ahead-press-enterprise/ BMC West, a North Carolina-based construction and supply company, closed its Perris plant in February, resulting in 304 layoffs. The company, which was acquired in January 2021 by Builders FirstSource, alerted the state to the shutdown in a notice sent to the California Employment Development Department last month. BMC human resources director Chris Valle said […]]]>

BMC West, a North Carolina-based construction and supply company, closed its Perris plant in February, resulting in 304 layoffs.

The company, which was acquired in January 2021 by Builders FirstSource, alerted the state to the shutdown in a notice sent to the California Employment Development Department last month.

BMC human resources director Chris Valle said layoffs will take place between February 16 and March 2.

“If an employee has lost his job or has been made temporarily redundant, he may be eligible for unemployment insurance,” Valle said in the EDD opinion.

Representatives from Builders FirstSource could not be reached as to why the Perris operation at 1800 Goetz Road will be closing, or whether any of those workers may be transferred to other company sites.

The merger of the two companies created a company with combined sales of approximately $ 12.8 billion for the fiscal year ended Dec. 31, 2020. Dave Flitman, the former CEO of BMC, has become CEO of Builders FirstSource. Chad Crow, who previously held the most senior position at Builders FirstSource, has since retired, although he remained as a consultant during the transition.

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Helping next-generation 5G cellular technology see beyond the trees https://hcingenieria.com/helping-next-generation-5g-cellular-technology-see-beyond-the-trees/ Sun, 09 Jan 2022 00:33:58 +0000 https://hcingenieria.com/helping-next-generation-5g-cellular-technology-see-beyond-the-trees/ NIST researchers studied the effects of trees on millimeter waves, which are predicted to be used in 5G communication. Credit: N. Hanacek / NIST Measurements of the impact of trees on 5G transmissions could prove vital for the use of a new class of signals. As 5G technology is fully implemented over the next few […]]]>

NIST researchers studied the effects of trees on millimeter waves, which are predicted to be used in 5G communication. Credit: N. Hanacek / NIST

Measurements of the impact of trees on 5G transmissions could prove vital for the use of a new class of signals.

As 5G technology is fully implemented over the next few years, mobile phones and other wireless technologies will become more powerful with increased data throughput and lower latency. But with these benefits comes a question: Will your next-gen cell phone be unable to see the forest for the trees?

This is one way of describing the problem facing cellular network designers, who must take advantage of both the pros and cons of a new class of signals that 5G will use: millimeter waves. Not only can these waves carry more information than conventional transmissions, but they also usefully occupy a portion of the broadcast spectrum that communication technologies rarely use – a major concern in an age when broadcasters compete for portions of spectrum like the prospectors marking out the territory.

However, millimeter waves also have drawbacks, including their limited ability to penetrate obstacles. These obstacles include buildings, but also trees that dot the landscape. Until recently, little was known about how trees affect the propagation of millimeter waves. And just as few of us would want to imagine a landscape without greenery, few designers would be able to plan networks around it without such a crucial fundamental detail.

The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) set out to solve this problem by measuring the effect of trees on millimeter waves. The effort could make a profound difference in the ability of our next generation devices to see the 5G antennas that may soon sprout.

The era of 5G will feature wireless communication not only between people, but also between devices connected to the Internet of Things. The increased demand for larger downloads by cellular customers and the lag-free response of the network by gamers has prompted the wireless industry to seek faster and more efficient communication. Not only could our current devices and services run more efficiently, we could make new ones: Autonomous vehicles will depend on such a fast network response to function.

“We will be able to do new things if our machines can exchange and process information quickly and efficiently,” said Nada Golmie, head of NIST’s wireless networks division at the Communications Technology Lab. “But you need a good communications infrastructure. The idea is to connect, process the data in one place and do things with it elsewhere.

Millimeter waves, which are new ground for the wireless industry, could be part of the solution. Their wave peaks are only a few millimeters apart, a very short distance compared to radio waves which can reach several meters in length. And their frequencies are very high, somewhere between 30 and 300 gigahertz, or billions of wave peaks per second. Compared to conventional radio transmissions, which fall in the kilohertz (for AM) and megahertz (for FM) ranges, the new 5G signals will indeed be very high frequency – something like a bird tweeting in the upper range of hearing. human relative to the depth of the radio, bass bass.

It is the high frequency of millimeter waves that makes them both attractive as data carriers and difficult to use. On the one hand, more wave peaks per second means the waves can carry more information, and our data-hungry age needs this capacity to deliver those faster downloads and network responses. On the other hand, high frequency waves find it difficult to pass through obstacles. Anyone who has passed by a house or car whose occupants are playing loud dance music knows that the throbbing low frequencies are most of what hits the outside, not the highs of a singing soprano.

For 5G networks, the obstruction wall can only be an oak leaf. For this reason, NIST scientists embarked on a somewhat unusual task in September 2019: they installed measurement equipment near trees and shrubs of various sizes around the agency’s campus in Gaithersburg, in Maryland. The study went on for months, in part because they needed a seasonal perspective.

“The study of trees is one of the few that examines the effect of the same tree on a particular signal frequency during different seasons,” Golmie said. “We couldn’t just do the survey in the winter, because things would have changed in the summer. It turns out that even the shape of the leaves affects the reflection or transmission of a signal.

The team worked with the wireless community to develop the mobile equipment needed to take the measurements. The researchers focused on single trees and directed millimeter wave signals at them from a range of angles and positions, to simulate waves coming from different directions. They measured the loss, or attenuation, in decibels. (Each 10 dB of loss is a reduction of a power of 10; an attenuation of 30 dB would mean that the signal is reduced by a factor of 1000.)

“The tree study is one of the few to examine the effect of the same tree on a particular signal frequency in different seasons. Even the shape of the leaves affects the reflection or transmission of a signal. – Nada Golmie, NIST researcher

For one type of deciduous tree, European nettle, the average attenuation in summer was 27.1 dB, but it relaxed to 22.2 dB in winter when the tree was bare. Evergreens blocked more of the signal. Their average attenuation was 35.3 dB, a number that did not change with the season.

(For comparison, the team also looked at different types of building materials. Wood doors, plasterboard walls, and interior glass showed losses of up to 40.5 dB, 31.6 dB and 18.1 dB, respectively, while exterior building materials exhibited even greater losses, up to 66.5 dB.)

While NIST’s contributions to 5G network development efforts might end up being as ubiquitous as the trees themselves, for most of us they will be considerably less visible. The measurements made by the team are primarily aimed at companies creating models of how different objects affect millimeter waves. Part of the effort was a collaboration with Ansys Inc. The company used measurement data shared by NIST to tune tree simulation models, which mobile companies use to plan their antenna arrays in. detail.

“Most models do not include information based on measurements on the trees,” said David Lai of NIST, one of the scientists who conducted the study. “They could just say that for a given tree shape, we should expect some signal loss. We want to improve their models by providing accurate measurement-based propagation data. “

NIST’s collaboration with Ansys contributed to guidelines issued by the International Telecommunication Union (ITU), the organization that creates guidelines for telecommunications standards. The results now appear as a new section on trees in ITU Recommendation ITU-R P.833-10. This publication serves as a reference for signal propagation models, which others will develop.

“Our goal is to get these metrics in front of the entire wireless community,” Golmie said. “We hope this effort will help the entire market.”


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McDonald’s has run out of hash browns in some Taiwanese stores https://hcingenieria.com/mcdonalds-has-run-out-of-hash-browns-in-some-taiwanese-stores/ Fri, 07 Jan 2022 09:18:11 +0000 https://hcingenieria.com/mcdonalds-has-run-out-of-hash-browns-in-some-taiwanese-stores/ Published on: 07/01/2022 – 10:18Amended: 07/01/2022 – 10:16 Taipei (AFP) – McDonald’s Taiwan said on Friday that some of its stores are running out of hash browns imported from the United States and are expected to suspend sales due to “unstable global shipping supplies.” The company has installed signs in some shop windows announcing the […]]]>

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Taipei (AFP) – McDonald’s Taiwan said on Friday that some of its stores are running out of hash browns imported from the United States and are expected to suspend sales due to “unstable global shipping supplies.”

The company has installed signs in some shop windows announcing the suspensions while the item is listed as “temporarily unavailable” on its menus.

“There is a shortage of hash browns at McDonald’s restaurants and sales will be temporarily suspended once they run out,” a statement posted on the company’s website said.

“We thank the customers for their support and apologize for the inconvenience caused,” he added.

McDonald’s Taiwan has announced plans to resume selling hash browns in the second half of this month after the restocking, and added that sales of French fries are “normal.”

Supply chain shortages have spread across the world during the coronavirus pandemic, affecting everything from building materials, wood and food to books, microchips and electronics.

Also on Friday, McDonald’s Japan announced that it would ration orders for fries to a small size only from January 9 for about a month – the second time it has been forced to place such a restriction on its customers.

For a week in late December, only small-sized fries were available in Japanese McDonald’s stores as the pandemic combined with flooding in Canada reduced potato imports.

“In addition to ongoing import delays, a combination of unforeseen circumstances including cargo blockages in Vancouver, disruptions from snow and bad weather on the road, are causing further delays in the arrival of shipments.” , the company said in a statement. Friday statement.


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Do you have any wood? Technology ensures that we never again suffer from another shortage of wood https://hcingenieria.com/do-you-have-any-wood-technology-ensures-that-we-never-again-suffer-from-another-shortage-of-wood/ Wed, 05 Jan 2022 14:22:00 +0000 https://hcingenieria.com/do-you-have-any-wood-technology-ensures-that-we-never-again-suffer-from-another-shortage-of-wood/ The pandemic has been marked by brief periods of scarcity around the world (remember the great toilet paper rush of 2020?). We’re temporarily running out of everything from gym equipment to condoms and even aluminum cans, and now a lumber shortage has hit near us, sparking concern among DIY enthusiasts and potential homeowners. whole world. […]]]>

The pandemic has been marked by brief periods of scarcity around the world (remember the great toilet paper rush of 2020?). We’re temporarily running out of everything from gym equipment to condoms and even aluminum cans, and now a lumber shortage has hit near us, sparking concern among DIY enthusiasts and potential homeowners. whole world.

Lumber scarcity pushed prices to a record high of $ 1,686 per thousand board feet in May, a high of 400% from pre-pandemic levels when prices hovered between $ 350 and $ 500 $. In August, there was good news as lumber fell to $ 399 per thousand board feet. But that didn’t last too long as lumber rebounded 50 percent a few weeks later.

For consumers, this means that it has become even more expensive to build, buy or renovate your home. Meanwhile, businesses could face increased construction costs.

Analysts say this continuing increase is not expected to return to thousand dollar territory, but it could continue until early 2022. At this point, you might be wondering where all the wood has gone? We will explain what is behind the shortage and rising costs and how technology could secure the industry for the future.

Where did all the wood go?

The peak was caused by several factors, the least of which was the lack of trees. At the start of the pandemic, demand for lumber was low and sawmill inventories were also low, thanks to workforce reductions and sanitary restrictions.

Then the foreclosure took place, resulting in an increase in home improvement, construction and purchase of new homes; projects that usually require a lot of carpentry. Basically, when increased demand for lumber meets supply setbacks related to a labor crisis, you get a global shortage.

Like all other industries affected by the pandemic, lumber production facilities had to adjust their operations, which initially slowed production and led to a decrease in supply. But even now, with sawmills back on line, reports show workers’ concerns over low wages and unsafe working conditions have created an employment gap in the industry, exerting even more pressure on the timber supply chain.

The demand for wood will only increase …

Wood has become the coolest thing (literally) in sustainable building over the past few years, and the housing industry is excited about all the benefits this building material has to offer.

Research shows that wood reduces carbon emissions, resists earthquakes quite well, and allows buildings to be built faster, resulting in less waste and less labor costs. In a recent webinar hosted by the Forestry Division of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, part of the agenda was to highlight the “essential role of sustainable forest industries in providing renewable wood-based products that the world needs to decarbonize the building sector. ‘

As the impact of climate change becomes more evident by the day, the shift to wood building materials indicates that lumber is expected to remain a prized commodity for the foreseeable future, and experts are daring. OK. Demand for the product is expected to maintain a steady increase through 2022 and beyond, in response to “demographically determined housing needs”.

In search of the Finnish “woodtech sector”

In countries like Finland, innovative construction techniques with wood are the latest trend. Their history of logging and carpentry, as well as the growth of its startup scene has led to the birth of a “wood technology sector” creating everything sustainable: textiles, cosmetic packaging, plastics. based on wood and, of course, wooden houses. Many public buildings in the country are built with wood products, and about 80% of single-family homes have a wood frame.

With more than half of Europe’s protected forests located in Finland, they make the most of their proximity to nature to create buildings that reduce waste and pollution. And they look good too …

Finnish companies like Finnos are also part of the growing ecosystem, providing digital solutions to forestry and carpentry industries around the world. According to Jyri Smagin, Sales Manager at Finnos, these sectors currently play an extremely important role and therefore there is a need for advanced technology that allows producers to create wood products more efficiently and smarter.

The popular opinion is that these industries are filled with men doing tedious physical labor and that they only use traditional and old-fashioned methods of production. However, we are introducing high tech and precise strategies to help fill the existing gaps in the carpentry industry.

Technology offers a way out

Much of the process in sawmills nowadays is handled by machines, but there are still a number of requirements that make the job quite difficult. For example, several factories use different automated tools to digitize and optimize raw lumber to ensure it is of the best quality for the market.

But these tools generate a lot of data, and someone has to go through the process of reading and organizing all of that information. It’s slow and tedious, and because we’re human, it often comes with a bunch of mistakes. This makes it difficult to detect hidden defects, resulting in loss of valuable wood. In this era of wood scarcity, this is a costly mistake for sawmills.

Companies like Finnos are offering a way out through technology. Using a log x-ray system, they create products that collect accurate and comprehensive data on wood quality at different stages of processing. Their newspaper scanner creates a 3D model of the newspaper and analyzes all of its features in less than half a second. Smagin explained:

When a tree is cut down, the green solution would be to use as much of that tree as possible, rather than cutting much of it down as sawdust. Our solutions help industries get the most out of raw material without wasting it.

The next step that sawmills must take is to match the quality of the raw materials in the sawmill to the actual quality required for a particular product, to ensure that it meets the standard. This helps reduce the time required for manual tasks, freeing up workers to focus on knowledge-related work tasks. With the growing demand for sustainable building products like wood, solutions like these are very important.

“Instead of spending long hours manually researching the correlation between raw material and end product, sawmill workers can now find the information they need in just three minutes,” says Smagin. This can help speed up the process of producing goods like timber, thereby relieving pressure on the supply chain.

Typically, when we compare the situation before and after the implementation of our technology, we see an increase in sawmill output, ranging from 2 to 5%.

Finnos has partnered with Thoughtworks, a global technology consultancy, to bring artificial intelligence into the process. Aappo Pulkkinen, Senior Data Science Consultant at Thoughtworks, said:

We are currently using machine learning to automate decision making throughout the production chain. Using imaging data from Finnos’ scanners, we are able to predict the optimal sawing configurations for each log early in the process.

And the results will only get better as they introduce machine learning to other parts of the business. According to Pulkkinen, ML can be applied to a range of processes – from optimizing capacity to adapting production to demand. Building machine learning components for production is an iterative process, where the learnings will help determine the steps needed to deliver the most value.

And we don’t see this just happening in sawmills – almost any company in the manufacturing industry can benefit from these types of advancements made possible by machine learning and optimization.

With customers in more than 18 countries around the world, Finnos seeks to play its own role in ensuring that the industry can meet demand. “With the current market price boom for wood products, our technology could benefit the global market,” he adds. They are now active in Nordic countries, Canada and Russia with the ambition to expand globally.


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Top 10 stories of 2021: CPSB registrations drop – American Press https://hcingenieria.com/top-10-stories-of-2021-cpsb-registrations-drop-american-press/ Sat, 01 Jan 2022 21:37:11 +0000 https://hcingenieria.com/top-10-stories-of-2021-cpsb-registrations-drop-american-press/ The Calcasieu Parish School Board reported a loss of 3,000 students last January, possibly due to homes damaged by the hurricane. Due to declining enrollment, the district faced a core program shortage of at least $ 12,960,696. The MFP is the dollar amount the state allocates per student for public school fees. CPSB chief financial […]]]>

The Calcasieu Parish School Board reported a loss of 3,000 students last January, possibly due to homes damaged by the hurricane. Due to declining enrollment, the district faced a core program shortage of at least $ 12,960,696.

The MFP is the dollar amount the state allocates per student for public school fees.

CPSB chief financial officer Wilfred Bourne said the reduction in funds began in February, but he hoped the students would return soon.

“Every child that we can pick up by February 1, we still get a credit for that, but for February 1, we can see that there will be a reduction.”

Superintendent Karl Bruchhaus said the state would hold $ 2 million per month until June.

“It’s a lot,” he said.

No teachers were cut to make up for the shortage, but the district absorbed the costs in other areas.

“We have a commitment until the end of the year,” said Bruchhaus. “We still have to pay all of our staff. “

Bourne and Bruchhaus remained convinced that the increased sales tax, likely due to building materials, and lower maintenance costs from hurricane recovery funds would help soften the blow.

“As housing returns, we still feel like a lot of our people will come back when there is a place to live. We are not panicking at this point. We took a hit, but we still hope that next year we will be closer to normal, ”said Bruchhaus.


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Rose-Marie Dekker | News, Sports, Jobs https://hcingenieria.com/rose-marie-dekker-news-sports-jobs/ Fri, 31 Dec 2021 05:24:28 +0000 https://hcingenieria.com/rose-marie-dekker-news-sports-jobs/ Rose (Rosie) Marie Dekker (Fisher), 89, passed away peacefully in hospice care with her daughter and son by her side on December 18, 2021 in hospice care at her daughter’s home in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Rosie was born on May 22, 1932 in Bingham Michigan, the only daughter of James Donald and Harriette Marie Fisher. […]]]>

Rose (Rosie) Marie Dekker (Fisher), 89, passed away peacefully in hospice care with her daughter and son by her side on December 18, 2021 in hospice care at her daughter’s home in Grand Rapids, Michigan.

Rosie was born on May 22, 1932 in Bingham Michigan, the only daughter of James Donald and Harriette Marie Fisher. Living the Bingham Farm Life Rosie attended the one-room Bingham School which was built on property donated by her grandfather for the construction of the school. Rosie married Tom Dekker in April 1951 and they lived in Traverse City, Michigan. In the early 1970s, they bought Island-on-Island Lake and built their cabin together. It was a daunting task as all the building materials had to be transported to the island on their pontoon boat. Rosie retired from the Grand Traverse Sheriff’s Department in 1990 and they moved permanently to Saint James City, Florida in 1993.

Rosie is predeceased by a baby girl Cheryl in 1952, her father in 1991, her mother in 1993 and her husband in 2007. The survivors are the daughter Sharon Bouwens (Dekker) of Grand Rapids, her son and his beautiful -daughter Denny and Andrea Dekker of Saint James City, FL, granddaughters Tammy Ashby and Christina Bouwens Bush of Grand Rapids, Abbie Rodriguez (Dekker) of Naples FL, and Betsy Dekker of Portland, OR. Grandsons Adam and Travis Bouwens of Grand Rapids, great-granddaughters Elizabeth, Jesalyn, Madison, Whitney Ashby, Layla and Hayley Bouwens of Grand Rapids, Blake Rodriguez of Naples Florida, Stella Dekker-Suhor of Portland OR., And great – grandson Luca Dekker-Suhor of Portland OU.

Interment will be in Bingham Cemetery with a small funeral service to be held in May.

In flower, please consider sending a donation to Faith Hospice, 8214 Pfeiffer Farms Dr SW, Byron Center, MI 49315. The family would like to thank Faith Hospice for the professional, compassionate and thoughtful service they provided to Rosie and his family during this time. .


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Home insurance premiums are rising faster than inflation »RealtyBizNews: Real estate news https://hcingenieria.com/home-insurance-premiums-are-rising-faster-than-inflation-realtybiznews-real-estate-news/ Wed, 29 Dec 2021 13:52:00 +0000 https://hcingenieria.com/home-insurance-premiums-are-rising-faster-than-inflation-realtybiznews-real-estate-news/ If your home insurance policy needs to be renewed, prepare to be shocked. That’s because rates are rising rapidly in many parts of the country due to what insurers say is an increased risk of climate change. While home insurance premiums have risen 4% on average, they have actually increased 11.4% since 2017, rising faster […]]]>

If your home insurance policy needs to be renewed, prepare to be shocked. That’s because rates are rising rapidly in many parts of the country due to what insurers say is an increased risk of climate change.

While home insurance premiums have risen 4% on average, they have actually increased 11.4% since 2017, rising faster than inflation during that time, the Washington Post reported. Insurance premiums now cost an average of $ 1,398 per year.

Plus, insurance companies say homeowners should prepare for further increases.

They blame it on climate change, which caused property damage of more than $ 82 billion in 2021. Homes in areas prone to natural disasters such as tornadoes, hurricanes, wildfires and storms experienced the most significant peaks.

“Climate risk continues to put pressure on everything weather-related,” Dan Porfilio, director of insurance at the Insurance Information Institute, known as Triple-I, told the Washington Post. “We are seeing more severe hurricanes, more severe forest fires, and the science is not as clear on tornado events in terms of whether or not they change in frequency. But what we really do know is that gravity is increasing. “

One problem is that it is becoming increasingly expensive to rebuild damaged homes due to supply constraints and rising material costs. In turn, this further increases the cost of home insurance.

Robert Dietz, chief economist for the National Association of Home Builders, told the Post that when natural disasters strike and damage hundreds of homes in a specific area, the price of building materials in those markets remains high for six to nine. months on average.

As always, some states are seeing larger increases than others. In Colorado, average annual premiums increased 21% from 2017 to 2020, while in Texas, rates increased 18% over the same period. Virginia, Maryland and California saw increases of 14.8%, 13.4% and 9.6%, respectively.

“There are some constraints on how quickly insurers can adjust their rates,” Karen Collins, associate vice president of personal insurance at the American Property and Casualty Insurance Association, told the Washington Post. “You can have [states] who have not experienced the same amount of rate increases simply because the carriers are still in this negotiated deposit process which stretches out for a long time.

On average, homeowners spend almost 2% of their household income on home insurance, according to an analysis by Bankrate.com.


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New home sales rise in November as consumer demand remains strong – RISMedia https://hcingenieria.com/new-home-sales-rise-in-november-as-consumer-demand-remains-strong-rismedia/ Mon, 27 Dec 2021 17:15:09 +0000 https://hcingenieria.com/new-home-sales-rise-in-november-as-consumer-demand-remains-strong-rismedia/ New home sales rose in November, driven by strong buyer demand, low existing home inventory and an expected increase in mortgage interest rates, according to the latest Commerce Department data. Key details: Sales of newly built single-family homes in November rose 12.4% to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 744,000 from a revised downward reading […]]]>

New home sales rose in November, driven by strong buyer demand, low existing home inventory and an expected increase in mortgage interest rates, according to the latest Commerce Department data.

Key details:

  • Sales of newly built single-family homes in November rose 12.4% to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 744,000 from a revised downward reading in October.
  • New home sales fell 14% year-on-year.
  • Inventory remains stable at a 6.5 month supply, with 402,000 new single-family homes for sale, up from 290,000 in November 2020.
  • The median selling price continued to rise to $ 416,900 from the median selling price of $ 408,700 posted in October, and increased 18.8% year-on-year.

Regional distribution from one year to the next:

Northeast: -1.3%
Midwest: -5.3%
South: -4.5%
West: -12.5%

What the industry is saying:

“Our members are seeing strong buyer traffic as continued low mortgage rates help fuel sales. However, builders still grapple with major supply chain issues and soaring material costs, leading to construction delays. ” – Chuck Fowke, President, National Home Builders Association

“Despite the increase in sales, housing affordability remains a major concern. With building material prices rising, the challenge for builders in 2022 will be coping with higher input costs while ensuring home prices remain within the reach of U.S. homebuyers. – Danushka Nanyakkara-Skillington, Assistant Vice President of Forecasting and Analysis, National Association of Home Builders

“New home sales improved for a third consecutive month as the housing market maintains its strength. New home starts have also increased this month, as many factors continue to align to make the sales market robust, including low interest rates and families looking for more. space for home work. November is historically a slower month for sales due to the Thanksgiving holiday, so continued growth this month continues to reflect buyer optimism and predicts a strong year-end. Kelly Mangold, RCLCO Real Estate Consulting


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