3D printable ‘eco-concrete’ makes housing affordable

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According to real estate broker Redfin, US home prices rose more than 13% year-on-year in September, with a median selling price of around $ 375,000. It’s data like this that makes it safe to say that homeownership, once a staple of the classic American dream, has become increasingly out of reach for the average person.

And with high real estate prices come high rental rates, resulting in economic challenges for everyone, especially those who cannot afford either.

Marieh Mehran, an Iranian-born architect who first came to the United States to study at UCLA, was first struck by the homelessness she saw in the Los Angeles area despite the wealth and resources that exist here in the United States The idea that homelessness was such a global problem prompted Mehran to use his skills to work on developing a solution that could create better access to less building materials. expensive and more durable.

The company founded by Mehran, called MAA’VA, created a durable, carbon negative building material using plastic and non-plastic waste, making it very environmentally friendly and cost effective.

In fact, traditional build time, costs and waste would be reduced by over 60% with MAA’VA, and the material can be applied in 3D printed or traditional applications. Mehren says she hopes the material will be commercially available within a year, when MAA’VA wants to partner with 3D printing and construction companies “or even build their own 3D printers to help. to build green, affordable homes for a larger segment of the population, “according to a report. The company says a 550 square foot home made with MAA’VA materials could be printed as quickly as 24 hours – a gain 90% in construction efficiency.

Ultimately, lower costs and faster turnaround times could mean a democratization of shrinking access to housing for so many people. MAA’VA says its underlying goal is to rekindle “the empathy hidden in architecture and science to serve humanity and our Mother Earth.”

Image Credit: MAA’VA

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